Professor Deborah Post Appointed Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Faculty Development

Date: July 18, 2011
Media Contact:

Patti Desrochers
Director of Communications
pattid@tourolaw.edu
(631) 761-7062

Central Islip, NY – Touro Law Center has announced that Professor Deborah W. Post has been appointed the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Faculty Development.

In her new role as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Faculty Development, Dean Post plans to work closely with the members of Touro Law’s faculty to support and promote their academic endeavors. “Touro Law Center has many accomplished faculty who are active and engaged in scholarship, advocacy and innovation in the field of legal education. I am looking forward to working with faculty to support and promote their work. The productivity and success of the faculty contributes in a significant way to the regional and national reputation of Touro Law Center.”

Dean Post graduated cum laude from Hofstra University with a major in Anthropology and took a job first as an editorial assistant and then as a teaching assistant to Margaret Mead, the noted anthropologist, before attending Harvard Law School. She began her legal career working in the corporate section of a law firm in Houston, Texas, Bracewell & Patterson, now renamed Bracewell & Guiliani. She left practice for a position at the University of Houston Law School. She moved to New York to join the faculty at Touro Law Center in 1987. She has been a visiting professor at Syracuse Law School, DePaul Law School, State University of New Jersey Rutgers Law School. Professor Post has written in what she considers her three areas of expertise: business associations, legal education and critical race theory.

Among Dean Post’s most notable publications are a book on legal education, Cultivating Intelligence: Power, Law and the Politics of Teaching written with a colleague, Louise Harmon and published by New York University Press and a contracts casebook, Contracting Law, with co-authors Amy Kastely and Nancy Ota.

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