Touro's Lander College for Women Holds Kick-Off Event to Celebrate Opening of New Facility

Date: November 21, 2006
Dr. Bernard Lander, founder and president of Touro College, and Dr. Marian Stoltz-Loike, dean of Touro’s Lander College for Women (LCW), following a ribbon cutting on the first day of classes at the opening of LCW’s elegant new five-story complex on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.
Dr. Bernard Lander, founder and president of Touro College, and Dr. Marian Stoltz-Loike, dean of Touro’s Lander College for Women (LCW), following a ribbon cutting on the first day of classes at the opening of LCW’s elegant new five-story complex on Manhattan’s Upper West Side.
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Barbara Franklin
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Barbara.franklin@touro.edu

Five-Story Complex on Upper West Side Educational and Cultural Corridor Features 48,000 Square Feet of State-of-the-Art Technology, Classrooms, Laboratories, a Library, Gymnasium, Art Studio and Cafeteria.

NEW YORK, N.Y. – The Lander College for Women (LCW) of Touro College celebrated the opening of its elegant new, glass and steel five-story complex in an educational and cultural corridor on Manhattan's Upper West Side Monday afternoon with a kick-off ceremony attended by students, faculty, staff, alumnae and members of the local community.

Located at 227 W. 60th Street between Amsterdam and West End Avenues, the ultra-modern facility - which occupies a beautiful new space in the center of one of the most vibrant Jewish communities in New York - is situated just blocks away from Lincoln Center, Fordham University School of Law, the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle and several new parks being developed along the Hudson River.

Lander College for Women attracts high-calibre young Jewish women, many of whom have completed a year or more of study in Israel and wish to pursue Judaic and general studies in a warm, stimulating and challenging learning environment. Following graduation from LCW, they pursue graduate study or careers in a wide range of fields including the health sciences, speech, law, optometry, medicine, accounting, marketing, psychology and education.

A crowd of approximately 200 gathered to celebrate the opening on Monday, the first day of classes at the new site, which features a total of 48,000 square feet. The complex includes state-of-the-art technology, a 4,000 square foot library, 17 classrooms, computer science labs, biology and chemistry labs, a gym, exercise room, cafeteria, art studio, student lounges and a 3,800 square foot outdoor terrace.

After a brief ribbon cutting ceremony, Touro's founder and President Dr. Bernard Lander provided opening remarks.

"This new building is vast and wonderful, built with exquisite taste in the center of the city. Soon we will be looking to get new dormitory space, as the school is growing very fast," said Dr. Lander. "Women ensure the future of our people and are the foundation of Touro College. They will help bring financial security and spiritual success, which helps make Touro a center of ethical, moral and religious values."

Dr. Lander paid special tribute to Akiva Kobre, senior vice president and chief administrative officer at Touro College, who guided the design and direction of the building.

Dr. Lander was followed by LCW Dean Marian Stoltz-Loike, who thanked everyone at Touro for their support in building the new facility and applauded the efforts of the College's administration, faculty, staff and students in working together to see the dream of the facility become a reality. In addition to Mr. Kobre, she also singled out Melvin Ness, senior vice president and chief financial officer.

"We are a partnership of outstanding faculty and administration, with creative and intelligent students who want to provide a home that fosters and facilitates learning and scholarship in a Torah environment," Dean Stoltz-Loike said.

The dean was followed by Dr. David Luchins, chairman of the political science department, who has been with LCW since its founding in 1974. He briefly chronicled the school's history, which has taken it through several locations, and then introduced Dr. Shuli Kon, an assistant professor of medicine at Mt. Sinai Hospital who has a private practice in pediatrics in Manhattan and is a graduate of the class of 1981.

"Anyone, who has at any point interfaced with Touro College, knows that it is a lifetime and worldwide connection. You never leave the Touro family," Dr. Kon told the audience. "Now the women's division, after years of temporary housing, finally has its own permanent home." She added that a key goal going forward would be "to continue to attract high-caliber, quality women who wish to attend a school that sets high academic standards and retains top quality faculty."

Molly Brock, president of the student government, thanked Dr. Lander, the faculty and administration on behalf of all of the students for the "many opportunities" the new building will provide. Ms. Brock said the students are very excited about the school's state-of-the-art equipment, gymnasium and other features of the facility.