Courses

The Touro College and University System offers courses related to human rights and the lessons of the Holocaust across Touro College undergraduate schools, the Touro College Graduate School of Jewish Studies, the Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center, and a Master of Arts in Holocaust Communication and Tolerance at Touro College Berlin.

Touro College Berlin

MA Program in Holocaust Communication and Tolerance

Contact: Prof. Dr. Peter Klein

Lander College for Arts and Sciences (Flatbush Men’s Division)

Below is a list of all Holocaust courses offered. For a specific list of what is being offered this semester visit the LAS Men's course schedule.

Info for LAS Students

HIS 155 – History of the Jewish People

The development and metamorphosis of Jewish political, social, and economic life from the Second Temple Period to the establishment of the modern State of Israel. The first semester ends with the expulsion from Spain.

HIS 220 Survey of Modern History I 

A two semester survey of modern European and world history. The first semester covers the Renaissance through the Reformation and Scientific Revolution until the downfall of Napoleon. The second semester begins with political and intellectual currents in the nineteenth century, focuses on the two World Wars, and concludes with the contemporary world scene. 

HIS 221 Survey of Modern History II 

A two semester survey of modern European and world history. The first semester covers the Renaissance through the Reformation and Scientific Revolution until the downfall of Napoleon. The second semester begins with political and intellectual currents in the nineteenth century, focuses on the two World Wars, and concludes with the contemporary world scene. 

HIS 251 – Jews and Arabs

This course examines the vicissitudes of Jewish-Arab cultural relations in the Middle East from the seventh to the twentieth century. Prerequisite: HMH 102 or permission of the instructor.

SAS 371 The American Jewish Community(annual) 

Size and geographic distribution of the Jewish community; education, income, occupation, and voting behavior; the historical role of American Jewry; traditional and alternative communal and political organizations; the internal dynamics of Jewish life; problems of identity, acculturation, and assimilation.

POL 101 American Politics

The institutions of American government and the forces that shape governmental action, with emphasis on federal-state relations, the structure and functions of interest groups and political parties, the role of the Presidency, the operation of the Congress, the courts, and the federal bureaucracy.

POL 103 International Relations

How nations and transnational actors interact in the international arena and why they behave the way they do with reference to power, balance of power, deterrence, imperialism, diplomacy and negotiations, international law, international organization, collective security, war, and the interrelationship between international economic issues and international politics.

POL 244 Political Parties and The Electoral Process

The structure and operation of American political parties, with emphasis on their organization, leadership, and political role. The course will also examine electoral strategies, the use of polls and the media, the effects of issues and personalities, and recent campaign financing laws. Prerequisite: POL 101 or permission of the instructor.

POL 261 Government and Politics of Israel (annual)

An examination of Israeli political culture in light of Israel's history and economic and socio-cultural structure, with special attention to the evolution and role of the major institutions in contemporary Israeli political life.

POL 310 – The Supreme Court and the Constitution

The role of the Supreme Court in the American system of government. A study of major constitutional problems that have arisen in the light of representative Supreme Court decisions. Prerequisite: POL 101 or permission of the instructor.

Lander College for Arts and Sciences (Flatbush Women’s Division)

Below is a list of all Holocaust courses offered. For a specific list of what is being offered this semester visit the LAS Women's course schedule.

Info for LAS Students

HIS 141-142 Emergence of the United States

The interplay of the political and social forces in America from the Colonial Period to the 1990's, with special attention given to the rise of political parties, the development of sectionalism, the causes and results of the Civil War, industrial growth, Progressivism, the New Deal, and the emergence of the Cold War. The first semester concludes with the end of Reconstruction (1877).

HIS 155-156 History of the Jewish People 

The development and metamorphosis of Jewish political, social, and economic life from the Second Temple Period to the establishment of the modern State of Israel. The first semester ends with the expulsion from Spain. 

HIS 220 Survey of Modern History I

A two semester survey of modern European and world history. The first semester covers the Renaissance through the Reformation and Scientific Revolution until the downfall of Napoleon. The second semester begins with political and intellectual currents in the nineteenth century, focuses on the two World Wars, and concludes with the contemporary world scene. 

HIS 221 Survey of Modern History II

A two semester survey of modern European and world history. The first semester covers the Renaissance through the Reformation and Scientific Revolution until the downfall of Napoleon. The second semester begins with political and intellectual currents in the nineteenth century, focuses on the two World Wars, and concludes with the contemporary world scene. 

HIS 271 American Jewish History

Study of the Sephardic legacy, German Jewish migration and hegemony, the development of religious communities, the Civil War, migrations from Eastern Europe, acculturation and assimilation, responses to Zionism and the Holocaust, and current issues. Historical and literary texts on the interaction of Jew and Gentile are examined as well. Prerequisite: HIS 156 or permission of the instructor. 

HIS 354 Topics in Jewish History

Study of selected topics, such as the Second Commonwealth, Ashkenazic Jewry, messianism, Hasidism, the Mussar movement, and antisemitism. Prerequisite: HIS 155 or permission of the instructor.

HIS 450 American Cultural History

(no description)

POL 101 American Politics

The institutions of American government and the forces that shape governmental action, with emphasis on federal-state relations, the structure and functions of interest groups and political parties, the role of the Presidency, the operation of the Congress, the courts, and the federal bureaucracy. 

POL 201 Introduction to Political Theory (annual)

A survey of political theory from Aristotle to the present. The development of political ideas and the writings of major political theorists in their historical and institutional contexts. 

POL 244 American Political Parties and the Electoral Process

The structure and operation of American political parties, with emphasis on their organization, leadership, and political role. The course will also examine electoral strategies, the use of polls and the media, the effects of issues and personalities, and recent campaign financing laws.

POL 261 Government and Politics of Israel (annual)

An examination of Israeli political culture in light of Israel's history and economic and socio-cultural structure, with special attention to the evolution and role of the major institutions in contemporary Israeli political life.

SAS 103 Introduction to Sociology

The unique perspectives and methods of social science for understanding the social realities of everyday life; the concept of culture, socialization, social perception and cognition; semiotics and anthropological linguistics; the sociology of knowledge, social ethics and norms; groups and stratification, culture continuity and change; human ecology.

SAS 301 Sociology of The Family

The family in various cultures but particularly in American society. Components of family structure, organization, and its relation to other social institutions. Family cycle and mate selection. Factors contributing to family instability and disorganization in contemporary American society. Prerequisite: SAS 103.

Lander College for Women 

Below is a list of all Holocaust courses offered. For a specific list of what is being offered this semester visit the LCW course schedule.

Info for LCW Students

HIS 155-156 History of the Jewish People 

The development and metamorphosis of Jewish political, social, and economic life from the Second Temple Period to the establishment of the modern State of Israel. The first semester ends with the expulsion from Spain.

HIS 331 N Topics in Early Modern History: Violence and Religious Fanaticism from the Reformation to the Present

Research into selected topics in the history of the Renaissance and Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Ancient Regime and/or the Enlightenment. Prerequisite: HMH 201 or permission of the instructor.

HIS 334 Topics in Modern European History: World Wars & Genocide in the 20th Century

Selected topics from the Revolutions of 1848 to the present, such as nationalism as a force leading to Word War I, the outbreak of World War II and its results, the Cold War, and the most recent global conflicts. Prerequisite: HMH 202 or permission of the instructor.

POL 101 N(H) American Politics

This course studies (i) the current state of American politics, including the leading issues of the day, (ii) the historical and constitutional foundations of the national government, and (iii) the major institutions of the federal government, including Congress, the presidency, and the judiciary. In-depth analysis of the Congress probes policy making and organization of Congress and it evaluates the performance and functioning of Congress as a representative institution. Additional segments of the course deal with public opinion, the media, and American political economy.

POL 102 N Comparative Politics

This course serves as an introduction to the world's political and economic systems. It details the concepts and methods of comparative political analysis by which political scientists seek a better understanding of these systems. Various models of government and economic organization are examined and compared. Policy-making structures, political parties and party systems, elite and interest groups are compared and the impact of ideology, political culture, and personality and social cleavages is assessed.

POL 103 N International Relations

How nations and transnational actors interact in the international arena and why they behave the way they do with reference to power, balance of power, deterrence, imperialism, diplomacy and negotiations, international law, international organization, collective security, war, and the interrelationship between international economic issues and international politics.

POL 212 NH International Organization Honors

The nature and functions of international organizations with special reference to the achievements, problems, and prospects of the United Nations and its specialized agencies. Attention is also given to the impact of regional organizations such as the Common Market. Prerequisite: POL 103.

POL 304 N Middle East Politics

A broad survey of contemporary Middle Eastern politics that looks at how historical trends impact Middle Eastern states. Includes the study of the influence of religion, state durability, and regional rivalries, as well as the Middle East within the context of the international system.

POL 305 NH Third World International Politics Honors

The emergence of the developing nations as significant members of the international system will be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the conflicting goals and interests of the developed and developing nations. Prerequisite: POL 103 or permission of the instructor.

POL 309 NH Civil Rights & Civil Liberties Honors

(no description)

POL 311 Introduction to Legal Principles (annual)

The nature, evolution, and purpose of law within human societies: the sources and techniques of the law, the distinction between public and private law, and an examination of some key conceptual problems arising under criminal law and the laws of contract, property, and tort. Prerequisites: HMH 101-102 or permission of the instructor.

POL 493 NAH Adv. Topics Honors: Democracy & Inequality

(no description)

POL 493 NH Advanced Topics: Terrorism and Insurgency Honors

(no description)

POL 538 NH Debating Justice Honors

(no description)

POL 560 NH Religion and Constitution

(no description)

SAS 103 (N) Introduction to Sociology

The way that sociology helps us to understand the social realities of everyday life. The nature and impact of culture and social structure. How society shapes individuals. Sociology’s perspectives on family, social class, gender, politics, intergroup conflict, crime, and other aspects of society. Cultural continuity and change.

SAS 233 N Sociology of Aging

The special character, dynamics, and relationships of advanced age. Consequences of the increased life span for personal life and social institutions.

SAS 371 American Jewish Community

Size and geographic distribution of the Jewish community; education, income, occupation, and voting behavior; the historical role of American Jewry; traditional and alternative communal and political organizations; the internal dynamics of Jewish life; problems of identity, acculturation, and assimilation. 

SAS 376 N Contemporary Israeli Society

The structure and culture of Israeli society in theoretical and comparative perspective. Concrete issues will include population diversity, political organization and norms, religion in the public arena, the kibbutz, the relationship of Israel to diaspora Jewry, the Arab-Israel conflict, the impact of Americanization and globalization.

New York School of Career and Applied Studies 

Below is a list of all Holocaust courses offered. For a specific list of what is being offered this semester visit the NYSCAS course schedule.

Info for NYSCAS Students

GHS 105 History of the United States from Settlements to 1877 

The interplay of political and social forces in America from the first settlements in America to 1877, with the emphasis on the development of an independent nation, early nationalism, sectionalism, reform movements, early industrialism, the transportation revolution, the settlement of the West, Manifest Destiny, slavery and the Civil War, and Reconstruction. 

GHS 106 U.S. History 1877 to Present 

This course completes the survey of American history. It includes the major forces that shaped America from 1877 to the present, including western settlement, industrialism and the rise of cities, immigration, industrial labor, American expansion and imperialism, political protest movements, the social and cultural revolution of the 1920s, the Great Depression, and the New Deal, the World War II experience, the Cold War and the fall of Communism, suburbia, the Civil Rights Movement, recent economic developments, the women's movement, pluralism, and changes in the Presidency. 

GHS 203 Immigrant Experience in America 

This course examines the unique immigrant experience of various ethnic groups. Students learn about conditions in foreign countries that gave impetus to emigration, difficulties in adjustment and acculturation, specific areas of achievement, attempts to preserve ethnic identity within the American mainstream, and contemporary issues and problems. 

GHS 203.6 Immigrant Experience in America/Topics 

This course examines the unique immigrant experience of various ethnic groups. Students learn about conditions in foreign countries that gave impetus to emigration, difficulties in adjustment and acculturation, specific areas of achievement, attempts to preserve ethnic identity within the American mainstream, and contemporary issues and problems. 

GHS 204 Medieval and Renaissance Civilization (upon request)

This course covers the period from the medieval age of faith and the founding of Islam through the Renaissance and the new Western beginnings in science, art and culture. Topics such as the process of secularization and the rise of individualism are studied. 

GHS 205 Emergence of the Modern World 

The interplay of political and social forces in Europe and the world from period of the French Revolution Period to the present, with emphasis on the rise of political nationalism, socialism, communism and Fascism, imperialism and the rise of global empires, the two World Wars, the post-colonial world and the emergence of newly-independent nations in Africa and Asia, and the Cold War and its aftermath.

GHS 210 African American Experience 

This course examines the history of African-Americans by placing it within the context of world and U.S. History. Coverage includes the African background, the effects of the transatlantic slave trade, the role of chattel slavery in the evolution of an African-American ethnicity, the era of Reconstruction, the imposition of a legally-based system of racial segregation, the growth and development of the Civil Rights movement, and current trends in the development of the African-American people. Special emphasis is placed on the many African-American men and women who contributed to the development of this ethnicity. 

GHS 210/210.6 African American Experience/Topics 

This course examines the history of African-Americans by placing it within the context of world and U.S. History. Coverage includes the African background, the effects of the transatlantic slave trade, the role of chattel slavery in the evolution of an African-American ethnicity, the era of Reconstruction, the imposition of a legally-based system of racial segregation, the growth and development of the Civil Rights movement, and current trends in the development of the African-American people. Special emphasis is placed on the many African-American men and women who contributed to the development of this ethnicity. 

GHS 215/215.6 Hispanic American Experience/Topics 

Survey of the history of Hispanic Americans from pre-colonial America to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the Spanish heritage, Caribbean and Mexican influences, new cultural adaptations, contributions to American culture, and current problems and issues.

GHS 219/219.6 Asian American Experience/Topics

Survey of the history of Asian-Americans from the beginning of their immigration to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the Asian heritages, new cultural adaptations, contributions to American culture, and current problems and issues.

GHS 240 Ethnic Groups in the United States 

Students examine the historical backgrounds of the various ethnic groups in the United States, both abroad and in this country, including the religious and social lives of the people, as well as the political and economic aspects of their lives in the United States. Also studied are the tensions among the various ethnic groups vis-a-vis each other and the larger "American society" which gave rise to racism and other social problems. The groups. difficulties in adjustment and acculturation and specific areas of their achievement are investigated, as well as their attempts to preserve traditional identities within the American mainstream and solve their problems in America. 

GHS 240/240.6 Ethnic Groups in the United States/Topics 

Students examine the historical backgrounds of the various ethnic groups in the United States, both abroad and in this country, including the religious and social lives of the people, as well as the political and economic aspects of their lives in the United States. Also studied are the tensions among the various ethnic groups vis-a-vis each other and the larger "American society" which gave rise to racism and other social problems. The groups. difficulties in adjustment and acculturation and specific areas of their achievement are investigated, as well as their attempts to preserve traditional identities within the American mainstream and solve their problems in America. 

GHS 262 The Holocaust in History (also offered as GJS 262) 

A history of the events and the catastrophe that befell European Jewry in the 1930.s and 1940.s. The Holocaust is placed within the context of European history. Anti-Semitism, xenophobia, the rise of Nazism and various Fascist movements are discussed. Jewish life and culture in Eastern and Western Europe is described in detail. German policies in both Germany and the occupied countries; ghetto, concentration, and extermination camp existence; Jewish resistance movements and the role of righteous Gentiles are analyzed. World reaction during and after the Holocaust is studied. 

GHS 262/262.6 The Holocaust in History/Topics 

A history of the events and the catastrophe that befell European Jewry in the 1930.s and 1940.s. The Holocaust is placed within the context of European history. Anti-Semitism, xenophobia, the rise of Nazism and various Fascist movements are discussed. Jewish life and culture in Eastern and Western Europe is described in detail. German policies in both Germany and the occupied countries; ghetto, concentration, and extermination camp existence; Jewish resistance movements and the role of righteous Gentiles are analyzed. World reaction during and after the Holocaust is studied. 

GHS 271 American Jewish History (also offered as GJS 271) (upon request)

Study of the Sephardic legacy; German Jewish migration and influence; the development of religious communities, the impact of the Civil War, migrations from Eastern Europe, acculturation and assimilation, responses to the Holocaust and Zionism. The social, economic and religious structures of the modern Jewish community will be analyzed as well. 

GHS 325 The Civil Rights Movement In The U.S./Topics

Conditions in the United States which contributed to the post-World War II Civil Rights movement; historical development of the impact of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision; black activism between 1955-1970; recent legal and judicial milestones; current needs, status, and problems facing the Civil Rights movement.

GHS 330 Black-Jewish Relations/Topics 

A historical study of the relationship between the Jewish and African-American communities in the United States, with special focus on the developments and issues that have united and divided the two groups since 1945. This course examines the present challenges and responses affecting the future interrelationship of both populations. 

GHS 335 America in the 20th Century

In addition to focusing on political and diplomatic history, this course will examine significant cultural and economic trends in the United States during the last century.

GHS 343/343.6 American Labor History 

This course presents an in-depth examination of the history of Labor in the United States. Topics include: Labor in the Colonial Period, industrialization and the rise of the factory system, the Civil War and early workers. movements, the growth of national unions, large scale industrialism and Labor; Labor during the Progressive Period and World War I; the Depression and the rise of industrial relations, Labor and World War II, unions and the Cold War, Civil Rights and the Labor movement; feminism; Labor legislation, the Labor movement today; collaborative models in the workplace. Students investigate the status and conditions of working people, the rise of the welfare-state concept, and the politics of the working class.

GHS 450 American Cultural History

The evolution and development of American culture, including popular aspects from its flowering after the Civil War to the present. The emphasis will be on the period after 1900. Areas include literature, theater, film, the arts, music, and other media. Students examine ethnic and other influences on American culture. The interplay between cultural developments and the American civilization producing them is investigated.

GHS 450/450.6 American Cultural History/Topics

The evolution and development of American culture, including popular aspects from its flowering after the Civil War to the present. The emphasis will be on the period after 1900. Areas include literature, theater, film, the arts, music, and other media. Students examine ethnic and other influences on American culture. The interplay between cultural developments and the American civilization producing them is investigated.

NYSCAS Social Science Courses:

GHS 362 T Topics in American Women’s History

The study of the conditions and experiences of American women, with emphasis on the period after the Civil War; historical development of the Women's movement after 1900, with major focus on post-World War II developments. The current status, needs, and problems of the movement will also be considered.

NYSCAS Human Services courses:

GHU 257 Public Policy and Services for Older Adults (Spring)

This course will introduce students to the policies, politics and programs of an aging society. We will examine the historical, social, economic and demographic issues affecting the elderly. We will also provide an overview of federal, and local legislation and their impact on the elderly. This course will explore the implications of age-based programs such as, Medicare, Social Security and OAA on the "Soon-to-be elderly.

GHU 261 Child Care and Advocacy (Fall)

This course will provide both a theoretical and a practical approach to the issues of physical and emotional child abuse and molesting by family members and strangers. It will provide an understanding of the effects of such abuse on the victim as well as the dynamics causing such behavior in the victimizer. Finally, it will provide an overview of treatment interventions for the child, parents, and other victimizers. There will be an emphasis on how to develop a network and referral system with social service agencies, hospitals, courts, and child protection services. 

GPH 240 (T) Value & Ethics in Human Services

This course surveys and analyzes the explicit and implicit values and ethical issues in the field of human services. Major theoretical perspectives are presented drawing on thinkers form the disciplines of science, philosophy, psychology, sociology and cultural analysis. A comparative analysis of ethical issues and practices in different cultures and societies are reviewed. The political and economic sources of values are considered along with how values and ethics affect the development of social rules and behavior. An examination of critical value issues at the national, city and organizational level are discussed.

NYSCAS Judaic Studies courses:

GJS 100 The Jewish Heritage

An overview of the historical developments of Jewish culture, values and practices.

GJS 225 Modern Israel (Fall)

This course will explore the roots of Zionism in religious tradition and the strings of modern nationalism which gave it a political form. Emphasis will be placed on Theodore Herzl, Chaim Weizmann, Zev Zabotinsky and Ben Gurion, the early Zionist congress, the rise of the State of Israel, the kibbutz, the cultural developments with emphasis on great writers, the role or religion in the state, Arab-Jewish confrontation and other contemporary problems. 

GJS 271 American Jewish History 

Study of the Sephardic legacy; German Jewish migration and influence; the development of religious communities, the impact of the Civil War, migrations from Eastern Europe, acculturation and assimilation, responses to the Holocaust and Zionism. The social, economic and religious structures of the modern Jewish community will be analyzed as well.

GJS 301 Jewish Ethics

In this course, we will examine the basics texts of Jewish ethics. The student will be introduced to the interdisciplinary concerns of [a] ethical theory, [b] the reading and understanding of classical Jewish texts and [c] the world construction of Judaism in its classical formulation. 

NYSCAS Philosophy courses:

Students will examine the ethical issues that arise in the context of business. The relevance of ethical theory to such issues as consumer rights and truth in advertising will be studied. Obligations to shareholders and negotiating strategies are discussed.

NYSCAS Political Science courses:

GPL 100 The American Political System (Fall, Spring)

This course will introduce new Americans and other interested students to the fundamentals of citizenship in American society. Students receive an overview of the historical foundations of our political system and institutions and their current structure and operations. The roles of Congress, the president, and the Federal court system are closely studied. State government and its place in American Federalism are also addressed. 

GPL 200 Introduction to American Government (Fall)

The focus is on the American system of government, with particular emphasis on the nature of federalism and the changing relations between the national and state governments. It features an analysis of the principle of the separation of powers, with attention given to the roles of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches. Non-governmental forces such as political parties, interest groups, and the news media are studied, especially with respect to their roles in shaping public policy. Special attention is paid to the "fourth branch" of government, administrative bodies such as the independent regulatory agencies.

GPL 201 American Politics and Foreign Policy

United States diplomacy and foreign policy making in the 20th century, with major emphasis on events in the post-World War II world. The East-West struggle, American and Soviet tensions, are analyzed against the background of shifting relations between the major powers, minor powers, and newly independent Third World countries. Also covered are U.S. relations with various regions of the world, especially the Middle East. Students are introduced to the governmental and non-governmental forces that influence the making of U.S. foreign policy.

GPL 210/210.6 U.S. Political and Foreign Policy/Topics

United States diplomacy and foreign policy making in the 20th century, with major emphasis on events in the post-World War II world. The East-West struggle, American and Soviet tensions, are analyzed against the background of shifting relations between the major powers, minor powers, and newly independent Third World countries. Also covered are U.S. relations with various regions of the world, especially the Middle East. Students are introduced to the governmental and non-governmental forces that influence the making of U.S. foreign policy. 

GPL 450 The American Legal System (Spring)

This course examines the origins of the American legal system in the constitutional framework and its common law basis. A main theme is the evolution and development of the legal system under the impact of judicial decisions, as well as under political, economic and social conditions. Students also investigate the interplay between the legal system and American society, as well as current issues, problems and pressures affecting the legal system today. 

NYSCAS Sociology courses:

GSO 121 General Survey of Sociology

The study of modern society with emphasis placed on the concepts of culture, socialization, and social perception; the sociology of knowledge and norms; groups and stratification; culture, continuity and change; human ecology. Research methods and reporting techniques are also analyzed.  

GSO 233 Sociology of Aging

Students learn about the treatment of the elderly in contemporary societies, with special emphasis given to the status of the elderly in America. The extent and effects of "ageism" (bias based on age) are also studied. 

GSO 318 Sociology of the Family

The family as an institution of socialization, social control, and reproduction is studied, as well as family organization and disorganization, and comparative family systems. 

NYSCAS Paralegal Studies:

PLG 101 Introduction to Law and Ethics

Introduces students to the structure of the US legal system and its historical antecedents through the analysis of a litigated case as it moves forward from the initial presentation of a claim or concern to a lawyer, covering informal fact gathering and investigation, case evaluation and strategy, parties, jurisdiction, pleadings, procedure motions, provisional remedies, evidence, discovery, settlement attempts, trial preparation, trials and appeals, enforcement of judgments, and alternatives to the traditional method of dispute resolution.

Graduate School of Judaic Studies 

Below is a list of all Holocaust courses offered. For a specific list of what is being offered this semester visit the GSJS Jewish History Course Schedule.

Social, economic, political. and intellectual history of medieval Jews, particularly in the major European centers. Emphasis is placed on developments in law, philosophy, poetry and mysticism. Topics include: the status of Jews under Christianity and Islam; communal organization and economic activity; Jews in European culture; Jewish-Christian polemics; controversy regarding the study of philosophy; crusades and martyrdom; expulsion, Marranism; Sabbatianism; and transition to the modern period. 

HJGN 601 History of the Jews in Modern Times (Annual)

A survey of modern Jewish history from the French Revolution to World War 1. Major developments are analyzed in light of political, social and ideological currents and trends. Emphasis is placed upon the emergence of diverse expressions of Jewish religious and secular identity. Topics include: the Enlightenment and emancipation; Wissenschaft des Judentums; rise of Reform Judaism; the Positive-Historical School: Neo-Orthodoxy; eastern Haskalah; Volozhin and the Yeshiva movement; Mussar movement; Jewish socialism; political and racial anti-Semitism; migrations; Hibbat Zion and Zionism.

HJGN 640 The Rise of Modern Israel (Annual)

The emergence of Zionism during the years 1880-1948 is examined with an emphasis on the major ideologues of the movement and factors which ultimately led to the creation of the State of Israel.

HJGN 642A Israel and the International Protection of Human Rights 

The seminar will address the development of international human rights law and politics from the end of the Holocaust until today. Our focal point will be the application and impact of these developments on the state of Israel. Particular attention will be paid to the United Nations system. The course will include a visit to one or more UN meetings

HJGN 644 The Holocaust through the Lens of Documentary Films (Biennial)

A study of cinematic treatments of the Holocaust and its public memory and representation.

HJGN 645 Jewish Life in Europe after the Holocaust: Community and Memory (Annual)

This course will examine Jewish experiences in postwar Europe, exploring social, religious, and cultural issues confronting survivors as they attempted to rebuild their personal lives and communal institutions in Eastern and Central Europe and in the DP camps.

HJGN 649 The Holocaust and Local Jewish Communities (Biennial)

Major Jewish communities of eastern Europe (e.g., Warsaw, Lodz) until their destruction in the Holocaust.

HJGN 654 Religious Issues in American Jewry

An examination of religious matters in American Jewish life from colonial times to the present, reflected in responsa, periodical literature and other primary sources. Issues will include: religious Reform and Orthodox responses to Reform; attitudes to the Zionist movement; Conservative / Reconstructionist Judaism; Modern Orthodoxy; Hasidism and the "Yeshiva world" in post-war America. 

Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center 

Below is a list of all Holocaust courses offered. For a specific list of what is being offered this semester visit the Touro Law course schedule.

LAW 617A/B Criminal Law I

This course examines substantive criminal law both in its common law and modern statutory forms. Topics covered include culpability required for criminal responsibility (minimum conduct, voluntariness, etc.); exculpatory doctrines and defenses (duress, insanity, mistake, etc.); homicide, rape, and other criminal acts; and domestic violence. The course also explores the problems associated with imposition of criminal sanctions, as well as reasons for and appropriateness of particular punishments, including the death penalty.

LAW 634 Constitutional Law Survey

This course provides a survey of current constitutional law, including the three branches of the federal government, the powers of the U.S. Supreme Court, congressional regulation of judicial power, and basic constitutional provisions. 

LAW 650A Professional Responsibility

This course explores the attorney's ethical obligations to the profession, the court, and the client under the rules and requirements that govern attorney behavior, thereby allowing students to confront and resolve the ethical dilemmas that arise in the practice of law.

LAW 666A Family Law

This introductory course addresses the legal relationship between persons who are married to each other, those who live together as a family unit without being married, and those who have children in common; obligations each partner owes to the other; grounds for the dissolution of a marriage; and economic obligations imposed by separation and divorce. The course also explores the legal relationship between parents and their children, including an analysis of custody, support, and visitation rights.

LAW 724A International Law

This course examines the sources, methods, and institutions of international law, as well as the impact of international law on U.S. law. Students consider customary international law, treaties, and processes for legal change in connection with a variety of substantive topics and procedural settings, such as the United Nations, human rights, and international trade.

LAW 776 Employment Discrimination Law

This course covers basic principles of employment discrimination law and examines theories of violation, methods of proof, administrative and judicial procedures, remedies, and litigation strategies. Students examine Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, as well as other federal and state statutes dealing with workplace discrimination based upon race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, and sexual orientation. 

LAW 800A Immigration Law

This course entails study of the Immigration and Naturalization Act and its constitutional underpinnings. Topics covered include the exclusion and expulsion of aliens from the United States; the acquisition and loss of U.S. citizenship; regulation of aliens; and policies and purposes behind immigration legislation and regulation.

LAW 858A Problem Solving Justice

This course explores how this alternative approach to the traditional adversarial system has taken hold and become the new way many courts resolve disputes. Students will learn about the history of the problem-solving justice movement; become familiar with the common principles and practices that make these courts unique; and gain an in-depth understanding of the various operational models. The course will also examine how the use of the problem-solving approach is becoming more common in traditional courts. Students will also gain knowledge of specific problem-solving courts, including Drug Courts, Domestic Violence Courts, Community Courts, Veterans Treatment Courts, Mental Health Courts, Sex Offense Courts, and others, through in-court observation and in-class presentations from judges and professionals working in these courts. Students will spend 2 ½ hours in a weekly seminar, and another 2 hours/week in problem-solving courtrooms. (No prerequisite.)

LAW 866A Family Violence

Family Violence is a seminar course that examines the nature of family and dating violence. The course will examine the dynamics of abusive relationships, how the law works to protect victims of family violence and their children, the intersections of family law (divorce, custody, visitation, and relocation) and family violence and the punishment and “treatment” of batterers. The course will also examine the intersections between family violence and race, culture, ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation. Students will learn about civil orders of protection, the criminal prosecution of domestic violence, stalking statutes, the Violence Against Women Act, relevant tort actions, and immigration and asylum law. This course may, with prior approval of the professor, satisfy the Advanced Writing requirement.  

LAW 881A Veterans & Servicemembers Rights Clinic

This clinic addresses the heightened need for legal assistance to current and former members of the military service. Students will work with veterans and active duty soldiers on a range of issues, including reemployment rights, discrimination, education and medical benefits, discharge review, assisting soldiers called to active duty and providing legal help to residents of the Northport VA Hospital’s long-term care facility. The clinic includes a 3-hour weekly seminar and a minimum of 12 hours/week of clinic work.  

LAW 913A Elder Law

This course examines the laws and social institutions that impact the aging population, with particular attention to issues of inter-generational justice, justification for special protection and pro-grams for the elderly, as well as ethical dilemmas for professionals assisting them. Topics covered include guardianship, conservatorship, and planning for incapacity; financing and delivery of health care, plus related decision-making; nursing homes; elder abuse; Medicare and Medicaid; Social Security; protection of private pensions; and age discrimination. 

LAW 926 International Human Rights

This course explores the rights asserted in international instruments and the manner by which they are protected under national and international laws. Topics covered include the United Nations system of human rights protection; the European Convention on Human Rights and its Commission and Court of Human Rights; the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (the Helsinki Accords); the Inter-American System of Human Rights Protection, including the Inter-American Commission and Court of Human Rights; the African system of Human and Peoples’ Rights; and International Humanitarian Law and human rights protection during armed conflicts.

LAW 937 First Amendment Seminar

This seminar offers an introduction to the law regarding freedom of speech and freedom of the press. The class concentrates on the importance of freedom of expression; the nature of speech - freedom of speech in public and private places; the relevance of the audience in determining the right of freedom of expression; censorship and permissible restrictions on freedom of expression; vagueness and overbreadth in applicable legislation; prior restraint; and symbolic speech.

LAW 903 Racism & American Law

This course begins by examining the extent to which racism has been reflected in the country‘s legal system, the ways in which the legal order has abetted racism, and the notion of law as an agent of social change. The course then focuses on contemporary uses of American law as a tool to reshape racially stratified economic, social, and political structures. The course examines primarily the experience of black Americans, but addresses also the experiences of other racial groups.

LAW 1754 Human Trafficking

This course examines the challenges to combating human trafficking, a multi-billion dollar criminal industry in the United States. Topics include both sex and labor trafficking and New York’s specialized Human Trafficking Courts. Insight as to the roles of these Courts and the efforts undertaken to provide meaningful assistance and alternatives to “The Life” will be discussed. Guest speakers from the Courts and law enforcement, attorneys and treatment providers will visit during the semester. Students may observe the Suffolk County Human Trafficking Court and meet with the presiding judge, attorneys and advocates. This class may fulfill the Advanced Writing Requirement and is taught by the former presiding judge of Suffolk County’s Human Trafficking Court. 

International Summer Programs

Vietnam

International Human Rights Law

The emphasis of this course will be on the political, economic and civil rights provided by instruments such as the International Bill of Human Rights. Worldwide focus has historically been on the failures of China and Israel to comply with human rights mandates; the course will focus on both of those countries. China’s proximity to, and impact on Vietnam requires an examination of the political and economic challenges confronting China. The relationship between civil liberties and religious beliefs in Muslim countries, as well as Israel will be examined. Vietnam itself presents a unique set of human rights concerns, and the impact of globalization and multi-national corporations on working conditions in developing countries will be analyzed.

Comparative Criminal Justice 

Despite the vast differences in cultures and history, countries confront fundamentally similar situations and challenges in setting the boundaries of harmful conduct and societal condemnation. We will examine the major procedural differences between common law and civil law systems including the roles of law enforcement, judges and juries, the conception of state power and individual rights, and evidentiary rules. Specific substantive topics will include consensual harm, prostitution and sex trafficking, the war on drugs, euthanasia, and hate crimes. In learning these varying approaches, students will improve their abilities to critically analyze doctrinal law and to recognize important differences in policy, and procedure as they concern criminal justice.

Germany

International Human Rights

Studying international human rights in the shadow of the Berlin Wall offers a unique opportunity to examine atrocious human rights violations, war crimes and a country’s subsequent efforts to correct and prevent them. In a matter of decades, Germany experienced the horrors of the Nazis and the repression of the Communist German Democratic Republic (East Germany). This course examines the development of an international framework of political, economic and social rights after World War II, from the trials of Nazi war criminals at Nuremberg to contemporary disputes over political, religious, economic and cultural rights in Europe, the Middle East, Asia and the United States. Students will gain a firm understanding of the fundamental human rights treaties, the principles that underlie them, and their potential application to the most significant human rights issues that arise each day.

Workplace Law in Global Context

The first part of the course will discuss globalization and the International Labor Organization (“ILO”). In order to understand the efficacy of ILO standards, it is necessary to understand the domestic labor and employment laws of member nations. Indeed, one theme of the course will be the challenges of setting international standards in light of varying cultural (and legal) norms among countries. Thus, the second part of the course will consider how different nations address specific questions of employment law from a comparative perspective.

Comparative Privacy Law

This course will examine search and privacy law from a comparative perspective that focuses upon the United States as well as the European Union and Germany. Recognizing the challenges privacy law faces in evolving technological, commercial, and social environments, it explores the evolution from established search law to the modern development of privacy law, such as privacy protection under general law and legislative measures for data protection in digital communications networks.